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Seven Arkansas Properties Listed on National Register of Historic Places

They're located in Faulkner, Independence, Perry, Pope, Pulaski and Union counties.
Walnut Grove Cemetery, Cord, Independence County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Walnut Grove Cemetery, Cord, Independence County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Camp House, Aplin, Perry County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Camp House, Aplin, Perry County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Thomas J. Hankins House, Pelsor, Pope County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Thomas J. Hankins House, Pelsor, Pope County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
W.F. and Estelle McWilliams House, El Dorado, Union County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
W.F. and Estelle McWilliams House, El Dorado, Union County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Paul Laurence Dunbar School Neighborhood Historic District, Little Rock, Pulaski County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Paul Laurence Dunbar School Neighborhood Historic District, Little Rock, Pulaski County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Southern Trust Building, Little Rock, Pulaski County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
Southern Trust Building, Little Rock, Pulaski County. Photo courtesy: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program via Facebook.
LITTLE ROCK, AR (News release) - Seven Arkansas properties have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the country’s official list of historically significant properties, according to Arkansas Historic Preservation Program Director Frances McSwain.

The newly listed properties are:
  • Hall-Hogan Grocery Store at Conway in Faulkner County, a ca. 1948 Craftsman-style building featuring Mixed-Masonry rockwork by Silas Owens, Sr. “The store was constructed for Edra Hall and the rock veneer was laid up by Silas Owens, Sr., a mason whose specialty was the Mixed Masonry form,” according to the National Register nomination. “Owens’ Mixed Masonries can be found primarily in the Faulkner County area. Examples of his stonework there date from the 1930s through the 1950s. The building retains its original herringbone-pattern rockwork and its historical associations with Silas Owens, Sr.”
  • The Walnut Grove Cemetery at Cord in Independence County, established in 1840. “Historically, the cemetery was located on the Old Military Road (Southwest Trail),” according to the National Register nomination. “Until about 1875, most of the burials there were of persons related to each other by blood or by marriage. Those families were Hogan, Churchill, Moore, Walden, and Jernigan. Later known burials included Black River Township neighbors and friends of the earliest settlers. The families buried in the Walnut Grove Cemetery site were eyewitnesses to a century of American history, spanning the period from just after Arkansas statehood up until modern times.”
  • The Camp House at Aplin in Perry County, a ca. 1917 Craftsman-style structure. “The Camp House is an excellent example of the Craftsman style,” according to the National Register nomination. “It is generally stated throughout the Town of Aplin that Mr. Camp bought the plans for the house from Sears & Roebuck Co. as a kit house, with the materials being shipped in by train into Perry, Arkansas, before being transported by wagon to the build site in Aplin. This great two-story, transitional bungalow house built c.1917, features large brackets, exposed rafter tails and a large bay window located in the front façade.”
  • Thomas J. Hankins House at Pelsor in Pope County, a Craftsman-style structure built in 1929. “The Hankins House is a good vernacular example of the Craftsman style,” according to the National Register nomination. “The exposed rafter tails and woodwork of the front porch still illustrate the Craftsman influences. When the house was built in 1929, the Craftsman style was one of the most popular styles in the United States, and the Hankins House shows the influence of the style in even the most rural communities.”
  • W.F. and Estelle McWilliams House at El Dorado in Union County, built in 1922 and reflecting the Craftsman, Classical Revival and Mediterranean Revival styles of architecture. “The construction and design of the W. F. and Estelle McWilliams House illustrates the growth and development of post-World War I revival styles in southern Arkansas, and the influences of the latest architectural fashion,” according to the National Register nomination. “The arrival of the oil boom in El Dorado in the early 1920s brought a lot of wealth to the area’s residents, such as the McWilliams, which also allowed residents to have high-style residences designed using the latest architectural styles.”
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar School Neighborhood Historic District at Little Rock in Pulaski County, with buildings dating to 1890. “As a collective, the district is representative of the evolution of a neighborhood from an integrated working and middle-class neighborhood in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century to a predominantly African American working and middle-class neighborhood in Little Rock by the 1960s,” according to the National Register nomination. “Resources within the District reflect the varied architectural styles prevalent during the late-nineteenth and early-to-mid-twentieth centuries. Indeed, properties exhibit a broad mix of influences and architectural variants popular during the period, influenced by regional and ethnic traditions.”
  • Southern Trust Building at Little Rock in Pulaski County, a ten-story, U-shaped, skyscraper office building built 1906-07. “At ten stories tall, it was the first skyscraper in Arkansas, a title it held for only three years, and was the first building in Arkansas to incorporate all of the major components of a skyscraper,” according to the National Register nomination. “Built at a cost of approximately $350,000 by the Southern Construction Co, it included fireproofing techniques, steel skeletal construction and electric elevators. It also included pneumatic mail chutes and electric lights. It was lighted by electricity and gas, heated by steam and serviced by three electric elevators. The building was designed by noted architect, George R. Mann in the ‘Commercial Style’.”
The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center and the Historic Arkansas Museum.
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