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Dr. Dunlap Talks About Bad Breath

Dr. Dunlap gives a rundown of how to avoid bad breath during the holidays and answers your Facebook questions.
We’re approaching the time of year when people are more social, with holiday parties and get-togethers.  One thing can really put a damper on seasonal social encounters—bad breath.  Dr. Bryan Dunlap of Dunlap Dental is here with some halitosis hints.

Check your breath:   According to the Journal of the American Dental Association, dentists see about one-half million halitosis patients each week.  You’ll know that you have bad breath when people start turning green around you.  

Bacteria is the key:  Bacteria is the most common cause of bad breath; sulfur produced by decaying bacteria makes your mouth reek.  Decaying food particles that your toothbrush misses are usually to blame, but chronic dry mouth, infections or medication you’re taking also can play a part.

A serious symptom?    Bad breath can be indicative of serious medical conditions.   Chronic acid reflux, some metabolic disorders and even cancer can be underlying causes as well. 

Go beyond the basics:   Avoid mints and sugar based candies; they’re quick fixes that generate decay-promoting sugars.  Proper brushing, flossing and mouthwash are a good start, but if that doesn’t work consult your dentist.
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