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Smoke Rises from Controlled Burns in NLR

Crews are on the scene all week in Burns Park.
Smoke from Burns Park controlled burn from downtown Little Rock. Photo courtesy: Amanda Treat via Facebook.
Smoke from Burns Park controlled burn from downtown Little Rock. Photo courtesy: Amanda Treat via Facebook.
The areas that are included in this week's controlled burns at Burns Park in North Little Rock.
The areas that are included in this week's controlled burns at Burns Park in North Little Rock.
NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR - Thick smoke will rise through Friday at Burns Park as crews conduct a controlled burn.

The prescribed burn started on Monday and will continue for two more days.

Each day the burn will start about 9 a.m. and end in early to mid-afternoon. 
 
Officials say there will be some residual smoke and embers throughout the nights and they will be monitored.  

Click here for a detailed map of the burn areas. The burns began with Tract 4 (white), then continue with tracts 2 (light blue), 1 (dark blue), and then 3 (green).  

Areas affected by the smoke include all areas of Burns Park south of I-40 including the soccer complex, golf course, and the Arkansas River Trail.

Click here for more information.

Additional details:
What is a prescribed burn? 
  • A prescribed burn is a planned fire conducted to achieve specific objectives. They are a proven and safe way to reduce fuel loads in forests and other areas and prevent wildfires. The fire generally does not reach more than two to three feet in height.
What is being burned?
  • The area in Burns Park selected for this prescribed burn basically consists of the forested area bounded by I-40 on the north and east, the park boundary on the north and west, the soccer complex on the south, and the golf course on the south and east. Within the unit are most of the park’s multiuse, natural-surface trails as well as the forested areas around the Covered Bridge, the BMX track, the RV Park, several pavilions, and several open grassy areas. The area has been broken up into several sections to take advantage of natural fire breaks (roads, trails, creeks, etc.) and have better smoke and fire behavior management.
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