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Arkansas D-Day Veteran Describes His Experience 70 Years Ago

70 years ago tomorrow, brave young allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy to turn the tide and eventually win World War II for the good guys.
FAYETTEVILLE, AR -- 70 years ago tomorrow, the history of the world changed, as brave young allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy to turn the tide and eventually win World War II for the good guys.

One of those who fought that day, 92-year-old Denman Wolfe is a Fayetteville resident who landed on Omaha beach as an army ranger.

"Mr. Wolfe is in my eyes, truly a hero," explained Kriss Schaffer.

Denman Wolfe joined the army in 1940.

Utah beach, Pointe du Hoe, Omaha beach-- he was 23-years-old when he stormed the Normandy beaches on D-day as a fifth-battallion ranger.

"We were briefed about how we were going to hit the beach and what we were going to do when we hit the beach," said Wolfe.

He says he jumped from the boat into rough water that was over his head.

"We knew some of us would get killed but still... we were all ready to go," said Wolfe.

Carrying his rifle and hand grenades, he headed for Omaha beach, with one mission in mind.

"Cross the beach as best as you could, you couldn't stop to think about nothing, you had to move on through," said Wolfe.

"The Germans were up on the hill, mowing us down with machine guns and their 88 artillery. So, people just falling all around you," explained Wolfe.

It's a story that continues to amaze Kriss Schaffer.

"I can't imagine what that was like for a bunch of 18, 19, 20-year-olds kids in the dark of the night jumping in the ocean. Must have been terrifying. But they are all so humble about it," said Schaffer.

As administrator at the veteran's home in Fayetteville, he talks to Mr. Wolfe almost every day.

"He actually told me his last thought when he jumped off the boat was, 'I hope I make it to the beach," said Schaffer.

"It was their duty. It's like Mr. Wolfe told me, 'we did what we were told.' And that's exactly what they did," said Schaffer.

Looking back 70 years, Mr. wolfe remembers his duty on that day and is honored to have fought alongside his fellow soldiers.

"I'm proud to have been a ranger, yes I really am," expressed Wolfe.

Wolfe's outfit ended up in Austria after the war and he retired from the army as a master sergeant in 1962.

At 92-years-old, he now lives at the veteran's home in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

He says the real heroes are the soldiers that lost their lives on D-day.

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