49°F
Sponsored by

2nd Lawsuit Filed Against Arkansas State Lottery

Two men filed a five-page lawsuit Thursday saying the ALC learned of ticket thefts in October 2012, but continued to advertise the same odds for winning.
LITTLE ROCK, AR -- A second lawsuit has been filed against the Arkansas Lottery Commission (ALC), suggesting lottery players may have had no chance at winning certain scratch-off games.

This comes after a former lottery employee pleaded guilty last month to stealing thousands of tickets worth almost a half-million dollars.

Two men filed a five-page lawsuit Thursday saying the ALC learned of ticket thefts in October 2012, but continued to advertise the same odds for winning.

Arkansas Lottery player Rick Tomboli is one of the men behind the lawsuit. He also filed a lawsuit in 2012 claiming scratch-off games contain a flaw lottery workers can use to identify winning tickets.

Now Tomboli believes the ALC falsely advertised your chances of winning a specific scratch-off game, after former lottery employee Remmele Mazyk pleaded guilty to stealing almost a half-million dollars.

"He took the odds away from the game, making the public think that, 'Hey we can look in the back of the card, if it's 3-1 odds, and if I lose, I can buy another one,'" said Tomboli.

Tomboli said some of the scratch-off tickets suggest 3-1 odds, but the Lottery Commission failed to address the correct odds of winning, blindsiding players.

"When you take a million dollars worth of tickets out of the lottery and out of circulation, your odds become 7-1, 8-1," Tomboli explained.

The lawsuit alleges the Lottery Commission failed to take any action on some of the scratch-off ticket games being sold to the public between the time the commission found out about the theft and when Mazyck pleaded guilty to stealing in July 2013.

"They never let us know from October 2012 all the way up to July the 12 of this year," Tomboli said. "They were the dates we were concentrating on, as far as we know the lottery commssion was aware of the tickets being out there."

These are tickets Tomboli said people are still buying.

"You should be compensated your money back," he said. "Your odds were against you."

An official with the Lottery Commission said it doesn't comment on pending litigation and will take care of it in court.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus